Gallery Lost Patterns


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Gallery Lost Patterns



LOST PATTERNS |  MERCURY  |  PHOTO COLLAGE  |  LANDSCAPES  |  IMAGE SERIES: PORTRAITS


These paintings are inspired by lost patterns and lost underdrawings revealed by scientist Pascal Cotte's digital multi spectral camera analysis of Leonardo Da Vinci's paintings Mona Lisa and Lady with an Ermine. The lost markings mirror lost history to me and the fragility of our own human existence. Change and it's inevitability ebbs and flows around us making things invisible which were previously visible.

Gallery Mercury


Gallery Mercury




I'm exploring in paint the issues of abuse of power, control, image production, information, mercury and mythology. I am concerned with the abuses of the medical establishment and the government. The misuse of mercury, the element, began at the end of the 15th century. Its misuse continues to this day and is closely linked to the rise of Autism, although hotly debated. The paintings seek to address images created to further an agenda, used by those in power. The paintings are flawed or broken to show both seen and unseen. Architecture is intended to evoke power as a symbol, a place where everyday decisions have the potential to inflict terror on society. With a range of stylistic approaches and methodologies I'm examining the nature of investigation, via painting, in relation to art history, as a reflection of the myriad journeys of the Mind.

Gallery Collage


Gallery Collage



LOST PATTERNSMERCURY  |  PHOTO COLLAGE|  LANDSCAPES  |  IMAGE SERIES: PORTRAITS


Gallery Landscapes


Gallery Landscapes




Gallery Portraits


Gallery Portraits



LOST PATTERNSMERCURY  |  PHOTO COLLAGE  |  LANDSCAPES  |  IMAGE SERIES: PORTRAITS


In 1707, Thomas Blount’s Glossographia Anglicana Nova defined the word image as “(Latin), an artificial resemblance either in painting or sculpture.”

Historically a portrait or sculpture was privately commissioned, often to mark an important milestone or event. Consent was required. Only the privileged could portray their image, which was carefully cultivated for status.

Today creating your image occurs through free social media sites. Your status is no longer defined financially.

The people in this portrait series are all artists and have all given their consent. Normally we see only their art, which shows us the world through their individual eyes. Here, they are the art. These portraits are a metaphor for consent.